Former Kamloops Mountie charged with selling cocaine while with the police force

Former Kamloops Mountie charged with selling cocaine while with the police force

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Randi Love as she appeared in uniform in 2008. KTW file photo

 

Randi Love, seen here at a 2008 press conference, was a member of the Kamloops RCMP in June 2015, when it is alleged she was selling cocaine. Love will appear in Kamloops provincial court on June 16.
KTW file photo

randi love indictmentA former Kamloops police officer has been charged with three counts of cocaine trafficking — with allegations she was selling the drugs while still employed as a Mountie.

Randi Love, who has since retired from the RCMP, is accused of dealing cocaine on three occasions last June, while still a member of the national police force.

According to court documents, the 40-year-old allegedly trafficked cocaine on June 13, June 22 and June 26.

KTW has learned Love retired from the RCMP in recent months after discovering she was the subject of a drug-trafficking investigation.

This is not the first time Love has found herself at the centre of a criminal proceeding.

In 2013, she was a key witness for the Crown in the fraud trial of her ex-boyfriend, disgraced RCMP Const. Trent Wessner.

Wessner was convicted, based largely on Love’s testimony, of bilking Costco out of $400 after ordering home-theatre equipment and claiming it was never delivered.

During the trial, Wessner claimed Love pinned the fraud on him out of revenge following a nasty breakup.

At the time, court heard Wessner left his job with the RCMP and had found work as a railway conductor.

Love suffered an injury on the job and had been on medical leave from the RCMP for some time before she is alleged to have trafficked cocaine, KTW has learned.

In 2008, her policing duties included media relations and she was, at times, the public face of the Kamloops RCMP detachment.

Love is expected to make her first appearance on the drug charges in Kamloops provincial court on
June 16.

18 COMMENTS

    • yuri, you might want to read the article before making a foolish comment:
      “…Love retired from the RCMP in recent months after discovering she was the subject of a drug-trafficking investigation.”

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      • full pay while being on reduced duty. 3 hour shifts nice. Gotta wonder whom she was associating with and whether investigations or co-worker safety was at risk.

        Sure this story will give local media weeks of material. Sorry but have never trusted RCMP members after YVR tasering and cover up of Mr Drazinski’s death.

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  1. Come on people…. don’t you know the media LOVES to sensationalize everything they possibly can?
    We should believe only half of what we read, see and hear, for every one of us has our own personal interpretation of everything in life. There was a family here in Saskatchewan (The Sterlings) who operated a child care facility, and were convicted of child molestation back in the ’90’s. After several years of being disgraced by the world and dragged over the coals, it was discovered they were innocent afterall. How devastating for that family! This is why I remember it so vividly, because not only was it terribly wrong, it ruined the lives of 3 people forever, and their names will be forever tarnished. Shame on anyone who blindly believes everything they read! Has anyone heard of David Milgaard from Saskatoon? He was in jail for 23 years, convicted of a murder he did not commit. Oooops, I guess someone goofed.

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  2. let us not rush to judgement she is innocent until proven guilty. don’t forget that the media thrives on sensationalism even if it destroys an individual. are all the facts out?

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    • Actuary, survey’s suggest that it’s the opposite. People think that if you have been arrested, charged and put on trial, most think you ARE guilty. Human nature, I guess. ( plus I just went through 2 jury selections this month…both cases starting soon )

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  3. “Judge not, lest ye be judged”

    I DID hear about that Sterling family in Saskatchewan and that Milgard fellow. How does one recover from such slanderous lies when names and faces are plastered all over the media universe for all to see and judge. That nurse, Gail Miller, her parents died thinking for 23 years Milgard killed her when it was actually someone else.

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  4. Too bad so many were too quick to convict Senators Duffy, Wallin et al. They never did anything all of their colleagues didn’t also do at one time or another. I’ve know Senator Wallin for nearly 50 years. The last time I spoke to her she was burying her parents who never lived to see her cleared of all the slanderous allegations against her. The marketing of that story by the national media should be a clarion call to any who believe the whoppers told daily in our “national media”. Thank God for small papers

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    • I disagree simon wagstaff–just because they “never did anything all of their colleagues didn’t also do at one time or another” doesn’t make it right. We all know that Duffy and Wallin took full advantage of tax payers because they could, not because it was OK. They knew it was wrong. Don’t let your connection to Wallin colour your sense of right and wrong.

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    • Oh, I get it. As long as someone else in the group cheats it’s OK for Duffy and Wallin to cheat. The only thing that saved their backsides is the fact that the Treasury Boards travel and relocation policies are written in “lawyeresse”.

      Somehow the excuse that “I didn’t know the rules is kind of lame.

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    • I give you a lot of credit Simon, admitting you know Wallin. That is the last thing I would want to admit. How many of us think the acquittal that O. J. Simpson received was wrong. With respect to what Duffy and Wallin did, it was not criminal but it was certainly immoral. Let’s wait until the justice system is finished with the charges that the ex-Mountie is facing before we make any comment.

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  5. Whenever any law officer is shown to have done something wrong, can’t help but think,
    Are parents to raise their children respecting these people ?

    Kids use to feel they could go to them for help.
    They upheld the law.
    So, now what are parents to do ?

    As was mentioned before, the incident at Vanc. airport, etc.
    Respect is going out the window for a lot of people.

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    • Years ago I filed a complaint with the RCMP public complaints commission about a particularly ignorant local Inspector. It dragged on for years. Once a year I’d get a visit from internal affairs asking me to withdraw the complaint. After several years I met a fellow who in the real world was actually a hero that the brass had relegated to the lowest rung on the ladder after he was nearly killed in armed confrontation and was diagnosed with PTSD. We developed a relationship of sorts and often shared coffee and conversation.

      He lamented to me that the tradition of honor and service that had characterized his training and early years on the force had been sacrificed by the “carpet corps” of HR hacks who now ran the force in Ottawa. He explained that for budget reasons the experienced officers who understood the traditions of the force and the oath of service they swore were replaced at the training academy by junior ranks who had little to no practical policing experience and whose qualifications were essentially sucking up and blowing down.

      The results of that thinking are now evident to all with eyes to see. The RCMP today is a Potemkin village of past glory trying to disguise current incompetence, poor training and quota driven hiring policies. There are still many great officers out there but they aren’t stupid and they see what happens to those who dare speak the truth to their superiors about their incompetent colleagues.

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