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Moving studios disruptive physically and emotionally

Moving stresses us all out. But, for some people, it is more stressful than for others. Most artists find moving from one studio to another disruptive, not only physically, but emotionally as well.
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Moving stresses us all out. But, for some people, it is more stressful than for others.

Most artists find moving from one studio to another disruptive, not only physically, but emotionally as well.

Pablo Picasso said, “We’re constantly moving dust from one place to another, only to have it replaced by more dust — entropy always wins.”

Perhaps he was talking about the energy and work that must go into maintaining a creative space.

There is no art without it.

Artist studios are like creative havens of joy and inspiration for the artistic mind.

The cluttered nature of the artist’s environment is filled with different shapes and colours that can divine creativity and random thought processes.

It is the way the artist’s mind is hardwired.

Artists must be able to find and create a space that can physically hold their ideas and creations.

When an artist’s space is destroyed or moved, the artist will often go through a period of creative destruction or deconstruction, in which their thoughts and mental connections are pulled apart like a Lego toy and reassembled elsewhere in a different pattern.

The mind needs time to readjust.

This is when the artist will set up another space and propel their aesthetic meters to the new environment.

Collecting can be a big part of this.

It can be collecting thoughts, ideas, visual records or snippets of conversation.

All of these trivial and random pieces of life are then filed away in the mind or studio and used later in a visual interpretation of something wonderful or terrible.

It doesn’t matter, as long as the inspiration makes a connection and has meaning to the artist and, ideally, to the outside community.

It takes time for an artist to regroup from a studio move, even up to a full year. But, once the art begins again, it is always different.

The change or move into a new studio will bring a shift in artists’ work.

Old inspirations are put away in space and time and, like children, artists have the ability/ need to live in the now. 

Literally drawn from the inspiration/traumatization of moving into a different space, artists will embark on a new creative path.

Anything left unfinished will either evolve or be recycled into a new creative endeavor.

The new art work, called a body of work, is seen as a good thing.

It describes growth and movement and change.

Movement is life and it is the same for art. Artists are compelled to create, it’s not a choice and it is like breathing.

If an artist cannot create, an emotional death can occur which can be followed by a physical one. 

One thing is for sure — change happens.

It happens all the time and there is nothing we can do to stop the flow. There is a river of progress that runs through our communities.

There is always room and time for another breath of light and a song of creative expression.

It is the beauty of being human.