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Kamloops revises number of late mail-in ballots to 60

As many as 400 mail-in ballots were believed to be arriving after the Oct. 15 election, based on the fact 600 of the 1,000 mail-in ballots requested were returned in time to be counted in the results
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The City of Kamloops received about 60 mail-in ballots after the Oct. 15 civic election, with those votes not counting.

Last week, the city heard as many as 400 mail-in ballots could arrive late, based on the fact 600 of the 1,000 mail-in ballots requested were returned in time to be counted in the results.

The city did not allow the ballots to be postmarked. They were required to be submitted to the city by the time the polls closed on general voting day — 8 p.m. on Oct. 15.

Chief election officer Amanda Passmore told council last week that the city received about 50 ballots per day on the Monday and Tuesday that followed the election, for a total of 100 ballots that would not count. She also told KTW the city expected the remaining ballots to trickle in over the following days.

A week later, Passmore said about 350 mail-in ballots remain outstanding. She clarified that she had rounded up during the council meeting, with only about 60 mail-in ballots having arrived late on the Monday and Tuesday after the election. She said the remaining 350 mail-in ballots are likely not lost, but rather, were not submitted.

It is possible voters who requested a mail-in ballot simply went to a polling station to vote or did not vote at all. A total of five voters returned their mail-in ballots to city hall after deciding to vote in person.