Cannabis company says no mislabelled spray ever reached stores

A Thompson Rivers University student claims she purchased a product labelled as CBD spray, but experienced the effects of THC

A former Kamloops mayor and MLA who is now an executive at a Quebec-based cannabis supplier said his company is “extremely confident” a Thompson Rivers University student is incorrect in her claim to have used mislabelled pot spray — a product expected to undergo scientific testing to determine its contents.

Terry Lake, vice-president of Hexo Corporation, said his company’s staffers noticed a discrepancy in their warehouse after sending a shipment of CBD spray to government-owned B.C. Cannabis.

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“We sent a shipment to the LDB (B.C. Liquor Distribution Branch, which also distributes cannabis) and, shortly thereafter, it was discovered there were six bottles in our processing area that should have gone out with that shipment,” Lake told KTW, noting the incorrect products were found at a Richmond warehouse and disposed of before any were shipped to stores.

Hexo was concerned some of its high-THC oral spray had been mislabelled as being high in CBD. THC is the intoxicating cannabinoid in cannabis, while CBD use is commonly associated with relaxation rather than a high.

B.C. Cannabis sent an email on Nov. 20 to anyone who purchased the CBD spray, informing them of the mixup.

“No customer ever got any of the mislabelled product,” Lake said. “We are extremely confident in that statement.”

B.C. Cannabis is standing by Hexo.

“After having carried out a comprehensive examination of inventory, Hexo determined that no mislabelled product was sold to customers,” reads an emailed statement to KTW from the LDB.

Last week, TRU student Kimberley Webster filed a notice of claim in B.C. Supreme Court, stating she purchased CBD spray and used it, then experienced the effects of THC.

In an interview with KTW, she said she was, at one point, scared of a couch.

Webster’s notice of claim states her use of cannabis also negatively impacted her performance as a student.

Webster described herself as being largely unfamiliar with the effects of cannabis use, but she was co-author with TRU psychology professor Chris Montoya of an article earlier this year about the dangers of marijuana on university campuses.

The headline of the piece, which appeared online at theconversation.com, was Marijuana-friendly campuses? I don’t think so.

Webster referred questions this week to her lawyer, Dustin Gagnon, who said he is working with Hexo to get the product Webster purchased tested in a lab.

“I’ve been contacted by Hexo’s lawyer and we’re in the process of working through a feasible testing process,” Gagnon said.

Webster’s notice of civil claim lists Hexo, B.C. Cannabis stores and the B.C. Liquor Distribution Branch, the arm of government responsible for distributing marijuana in the province, as defendants.

None of Webster’s claims have been proven in court.

© 2018 Kamloops This Week

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