The Red Brigade plans to dance-protest pipeline project in Kamloops

On Oct. 7, people dressed in crimson outfits and white face makeup will attend the Cando yard on Mission Flats, where pipe has been stored, and walk in a funeral procession on public property as part of an international initiative highlighting areas affected by climate change

Protestors are planning to perform “guerrilla theatre” on Monday, Oct. 7, outside a storage area for the Trans Mountain expansion project.

Kamloops author and music teacher Katie Welch said 10 people dressed in crimson outfits and white face makeup will attend the Cando yard on Mission Flats, where pipe has been stored, and walk in a funeral procession on public property as part of an international initiative highlighting areas affected by climate change.

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“We’re right in the middle of the Trans Mountain pipeline and, if it is twinned, there’s absolutely no way that we’re going to meet our [climate] goals,” Welch told KTW.

The Kamloops Red Brigade was formed in the last two weeks, piggybacking the Extinction Rebellion out of the United Kingdom. Welch said she wanted to do something “other than just wave signs” and brought the idea to dance friends.

After the theatrical funeral procession, which will travel about 50 metres to a fence warning against trespassing on private property, the group will have a short performance. Welch said the group does not plan to trespass and that the protest will be peaceful. She invited others to attend the noon event, with signs calling for action.

A videographer will be in attendance to spread the message on social media.

That message?

“The Trans Mountain pipeline shouldn’t be twinned,” Welch said. “It will result in gigatons more of carbon dioxide being emitted into the atmosphere. … It’s basically damning the world to irreversible climate change.”

Asked what she would tell Albertans who are out of work as they wait to get their product to market, Welch said the province has relied too heavily on the oil and gas industry. She said those workers should be first in line for jobs in the renewable energy sector.

“Our tax dollars go to help subsidize the oil and gas industry,” Welch said. “If that money went to Albertans to create new jobs in clean energy, they could do amazing things. We could be a world leader in alternative energy.”

Welch said she is not affiliated with a political party.

Local officials have expressed concern about protests, which could arise in Kamloops as a result of the project.

© Kamloops This Week

 


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