West Victoria project highlights busy 2019 in Kamloops

The two-year project will impact the major arterial route into downtown, affecting motorists and businesses

Significant capital projects will be undertaken by the city over the next few years, beginning this year.

“Coming up now — 2019, 2020, 2021 and further out — we’ve got a lot of major projects coming,” City of Kamloops capital projects manager Darren Crundwell said.

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“Both on the roads and building side of things.”

Crundwell said the city closed just before Christmas on proposals for a two-year, $13-million project to reconstruct West Victoria Street, which is slated to begin in April.

The city received four submissions from local contractors.

“That is our biggest priority. We are going to get on that and we will be contacting the successful proponent as soon as possible,” he said. “As of this point, we haven’t looked at proposals yet.”

The project will impact the major arterial route into downtown, affecting motorists and businesses. Crundwell said open houses and full-time communications will be planned for that and other large projects on the horizon.

“It will look very similar to Overlanders [Bridge reconstruction in 2015],” he said. “We’re really going to put the focus on that. The pipes and the asphalt and the road is important, but I think what’s most important is people want to know what’s going on.”

In Barnhartvale, Todd Road from Klahanie Drive to Ronde Lane will also be reconstructed this year.

The project will include the addition of a pedestrian shoulder and water and sewer work.

It will likely begin this spring and is expected to be completed by the end of the year. The city will put out a request for proposals by the end of January. Barnhartvale residents have been eagerly awaiting the roadwork, as a desire for pedestrian improvements was initially brought forward in 2015.

“I know it probably frustrated some of the residents, but we were aligning replacement to the water and the sanitary with reconstruction of the road,” Crundwell said, noting the city tries to avoid tearing up new asphalt.

Other work on the horizon includes roadwork on Valleyview Drive, a new reservoir in Valleyview, reconstruction of a water booster station (which helps transport water to places like Aberdeen) on Arrowstone Drive and replacing the sanitary main on Tranquille Road, which will be a project similar in size and scope to West Victoria Street.

Facilities work will also be required, due to aging infrastructure, including at the Tournament Capital Centre.

“All of our facilities, we haven’t built an ice rink since 1993,” Crundwell said. “Looking at all of those, they’re all around the same age. We’ve got to start investing money into those.”

As for the year that was, the city was kept busy with smaller paving and reconstruction

projects.

The North Thompson emergency water intake was the biggest capital project in 2018.

Capital projects are mostly funded by consistent annual funding for water, sewers, stormwater systems and roads. Crundwell said larger projects are cyclical and staff work within existing budgets.

“We’re also planning these and trying to fit them in, but we’re also doing it in such a way that we’re not going back for more money,” Crundwell said.

“We’re utilizing existing budgets.”

© Kamloops This Week

 

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