Letter: Never forget — Rayleigh is train territory

Editor:

Re: KTW article of Dec. 12 (‘Trapped by tracks? Rayleigh resident wants action’):

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When we moved out to Rayleigh 43 years ago, the first thing we noticed was we had to cross train tracks to get in and out of the community.

But we chose to stay and we built our home a block-and-a-half from those train tracks.

Out our back door, there was nothing but open field between us and those tracks.

We saw those trains go by and we listened to their whistles blow through Rayleigh because there were no crossing lights at that time.

We listened to the clickety-clack of the old-style train tracks.

We were in train territory.

We felt the vibrations of the loaded wheat and coal cars as they went through Rayleigh.

Our children enjoyed waving to the engineers and they waved back.

These are all good memories.

In all those years and even now, very, very seldom do the two train crossings in Rayleigh ever get blocked.

When they do, it is usually due to trains going into the railyard — and they are only stopped five to 15 minutes before moving along again.

On the sad side, many Rayleigh residents remember when they had to evacuate our community in 2004 due to a wildfire.

It is an insult to suggest the Canadian National Railway’s head office can’t keep in communication with their engineers when it concerns emergency situations.

We will never regret moving out to Rayleigh because it is a wonderful place to raise a family.

Thank you, CNR, for helping to make living next to train tracks an experience some people don’t appreciate.

As of late, there have been some negative feelings toward the CNR because some feel their lives have been inconvenienced.

Perhaps these people will find their perfect world back on the other side of the tracks they chose to cross in the first place.

They need to remember that Rayleigh is train territory.

Marjorie Sutherland

Kamloops

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