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Letter: Still raw from pandemic effects

The memories of pandemic lockdown are still raw and vivid. Can we learn to dig a little deeper into what is the good part of being humans?

Editor:

People, in general, might be pretty fed up with COVID-19. Like it or not, we are in it for the long haul.

We might still face some more restrictions, testing of folks from other countries arriving at our airports and having to wear masks again for a while. 

But can’t we just think of others for a while?

The memories of the height of the pandemic are pretty raw for a lot of people. 

When I visited a local long-term care home during the first summer of the pandemic, I could see faces of the residents through the glass.

What level of loneliness and isolation were they experiencing? Apparently, a guy in real life bringing live music to them was the high point in their lives for that day.

There were family members who could only wait and be told of loved ones dying inside the confines of care homes.

I’m sure there are families here in Kamloops who had that experience. Their memories of pandemic lockdown are still raw and vivid. Guilt is part of their lives.

The last time I saw my twin brother was in early December, before the lockdown happened. 

Cancer took his life before I could see him again.

Every evening we talked to each other on the phone; the last couple of times his breathing was so laboured, I could hardly make out what he was saying. It went from speaking with him every night to there being a vacuum without him. 

Six weeks later, my oldest brother died. 

The memories of pandemic lockdown are still raw and vivid. Guilt is part of my life.

What I and many others would have been able to do had effective vaccines been available a little sooner.

Can we learn to dig a little deeper into what is the good part of being humans? Are some of the measures we may face really all that difficult in the bigger scheme of things?

These are questions we need to ask ourselves.

John Noakes
Kamloops