Skip to content

Letter: The climate emergency is here

We need to get on with this critically important work if we love our children and grandchildren. We need to rely on our own collective actions and not count on governments and corporations alone to resolve this emergency
letters

Editor:

On Nov. 6, as part of a global rally for climate justice, more than 150 Kamloopsians gathered to ask local leaders and citizens to sign a pledge to commit to strong action on the climate emergency and ensure a just transition to a sustainable low-carbon future, and to work with all levels of government to ensure this happens.

Meanwhile, world leaders were meeting at the COP26 conference in Glasgow to discuss their plans on this issue. Climate justice refers to helping people in greenhouse gas-producing jobs and businesses transition to carbon-neutral enterprises and help countries of the global south (who, despite producing the least amount of greenhouse gases, are suffering the most with the effects of climate change) cope and transition to a livable future.

After the summer we’ve just experienced in B.C., with record-shattering temperatures in late June that took the lives of 600 British Columbians, extreme fires, smoke-choked skies and drought, coupled with this past weekend’s record-shattering extreme rains and resulting floods and mudslides, we can be sure the climate emergency is here in our neck of the woods.

People’s lives are being seriously disrupted and we can expect more of the same and worse for years to come.

The Glasgow COP26 conference resulted in more commitments to bring emissions down to a level that, if all the all the commitments are kept, will see temperatures still rise by 2.4 degrees C by the end of the century, much higher than the original 2015 Paris Agreement to keep temperature rise to 1.5 C above pre-industrial levels.

After 25 previous years of such conferences, governments’ past commitments have been largely unfulfilled; in fact, global emissions have continued to rise precariously, bringing us closer to irreversible tipping points, which would mean our existence as a human species, along with many other species, is profoundly threatened.

We must start putting our heads together to collectively resolve the issues we are facing. You can take a step by signing the pledge, organized through Kamloops Climate Cafés and Transition Kamloops, online at transitionkamloops.net.

We need to get on with this critically important work if we love our children and grandchildren. We need to rely on our own collective actions and not count on governments and corporations alone to resolve this emergency.

Margaret Huff

Kamloops